What is happening to the rainforest in Indonesia compared to Brazil?

Why are rainforests in Indonesia being destroyed?

Despite government regulations Indonesia’s forests are still being cleared for palm oil, pulp wood, logging and mining. Palm oil continues to be one of the leading drivers of deforestation and Indonesia is the largest producer of palm oil.

What is the Indonesian government doing about deforestation?

Land use change, which includes deforestation and forest fires, accounts for most of Indonesia’s greenhouse gas emissions. Under Indonesia’s NDC, the government allows up to 325,000 hectares (803,000 acres) of deforestation per year to reach its emissions reduction goal while leaving room for economic development.

What percent of Indonesia is rainforest?

Incredibly, with just 1 percent of the Earth’s land area, Indonesia’s rainforests contain 10 percent of the world’s known plant species, 12 percent of mammal species – including endangered orangutans and critically endangered Sumatran tigers and rhinos – and 17 percent of all known bird species.

How many endangered species are there in Indonesia 2020?

There are 68 species which are critically endangered and 69 endangered species, and 517 vulnerable species.

Is deforestation a problem in Indonesia?

The data reported deforestation of 440,000 hectares in 2018, slightly lower than the 2017 number of 480,000 hectares. Global Forest Watch released similar numbers showing a 40 percent decrease in deforestation in Indonesia’s primary forests in 2018, compared to the average annual rate of loss from 2002-2016.

Why is Borneo losing its jungle?

As in many tropical areas around the world, Borneo’s rainforests are being cut and degraded for timber, palm oil, pulp, rubber and minerals. The increase in these activities is being matched by a growth in illegal wildlife trade, as cleared forests provide easy access to more remote areas.

What countries are reducing deforestation?

Norway’s deforestation ban is a commitment to deforestation-free supply chains. It means that Norwegians will refuse to award government contracts to companies that engage in clear-cutting.

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