Why do Indonesians use Malay?

Why is Malay the national language of Indonesia?

century, Malay was chosen as the national language of the Indonesian republic and why it has played such an important role in forging Indonesia’s unity. Malay has also functioned as a court language. It was evidently the language of the Sumatran empire of Sriwijaya (9th to 14th centuries).

Why is Indonesian and Malaysian similar?

Malaysian and Indonesian are two standardised varieties of the Malay language, used in Malaysia and Indonesia, respectively. Both varieties are generally mutually intelligible, yet there are noticeable differences in spelling, grammar, pronunciation and vocabulary, as well as the predominant source of loanwords.

Is Indonesian a dialect of Malay?

In Singapore and Brunei, it is called Bahasa Melayu (“Malay language”) and in Indonesia, an autonomous normative variety called Bahasa Indonesia (“Indonesian language”) is designated the Bahasa Persatuan/Pemersatu (“unifying language”/lingua franca).

Malay language.

Malay
Standard forms Indonesian Malaysian

What language is Malay similar to?

Malay shows the closest relationship to most of the other languages of Sumatra (Minangkabau, Kerintji, Rejang) and is clearly, but not so closely, related to the other Austronesian languages of Sumatra, Borneo, Java, and to the Cham languages of Vietnam.

Is Malay similar to Chinese?

Malaysian Mandarin’s phonology is closer to the Mandarin accents of Southern China, than towards the Beijing standard pronunciation, due to the influence of other dialects such as Cantonese and Hokkien.

Why does Indonesia not speak Dutch?

Dutch language policy failed to make Dutch an international language because of its lack of vision. There are fewer than 25 million Dutch speakers, in the Netherlands, Flanders, Suriname and the Caribbean. Had Indonesia become Dutch-speaking as well, there would be 300 million.

How do you greet someone in Malay?

The common Malay verbal greeting is “Salaam”. Elders may be address as “pakcik” (uncle) or “makcik” (aunty) out of respect. You may similarly be referred to in this way by people younger than yourself. The common greeting across all ethnicities is a handshake.

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